Southern Snacks Cookbook

The Southern Sympathy Cookbook

I'm P.C., and I have studied food and cooking around the world, mostly by eating, but also through serious study. Coursework at Le Cordon Bleu London and intensive courses in Morocco, Thailand and France have broadened my culinary skill and palate. But my kitchen of choice is at home, cooking like most people, experimenting with unique but practical ideas.

I live, mostly in my kitchen, in my hometown of Memphis, Tennessee.

Cajeta Caramel Cake with Cajeta Whipped Cream

Cinco de Mayo is something of a silly commercial enterprise, but all the ads and instore displays do peak my interest in recipe with the flavors of Mexico. I usually focus on meals, like Chicken Tingatacos or Queso Fundido Soup, but there is always room for dessert. I am certainly no expert on Mexican cuisine, but I love to explore ingredients and ideas. I was introduced to cajeta some years ago at an ice cream parlor here in Memphis that specializes in Mexican paleta popsicles, and I have become a little obsessed – I use it in all sorts of applications instead of a standard caramel. Of course, this cake is good at anytime of the year, but it is a lovely end to a spicy fiesta-style meal.

Cajeta is a delicious caramel, dulce de leche-like sauce made with goat milk and that goat milk tang makes it a truly special treat. The first time I served this, one of my dinner guests immediately recognized the bite of goat cheese-like bite. You can find cajeta in jars or bottles in the Hispanic food section of many grocery stores or a Latin market but making your own is easy and really adds a special touch. People are always impressed when you do things like this from scratch! Once you master it, you may find yourself making it all the time. It is fantastic over ice cream or with fruit for dipping. I love to layer the rich cajeta flovor by adding it to a whipped cream that perfectly complements the rich cake.

Cajeta Caramel Cake with Cajeta Whipped Cream
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For the Cake
  1. 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  2. 1 cup packed dark brown sugar
  3. 1 cup cajeta (homemade or purchased), at room temperature, see below
  4. 4 large eggs, at room temperature
  5. 3 cups all-purpose flour
  6. 2 teaspoons baking powder
  7. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  8. ½ teaspoon salt
  9. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  10. 1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature
  11. Confectioners’ sugar
For the Cajeta Whipped Cream
  1. ¾ cups heavy whipping cream
  2. ¼ cup cajeta (homemade or purchased), at room temperature
  3. A pinch of flaky salt
For the Cake
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 12-cup bundt pan with baking spray.
  2. Beat the butter and sugar together in the bowl of a stand mixer until light and fluffy. Add the cajeta and beat until smooth and completely combined. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, making sure each egg is combined before adding the next. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Beat in the vanilla extract, then add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in three additions, alternating with the buttermilk, until the batter is smooth and combined. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth it out to an even layer. Tap the pan on the counter a few times to release any air bubbles, then bake for 45 – 55 minutes, until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool the cake in the pan for 15 minutes, then invert onto a serving platter to cool completely. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar before serving.
For the Whipped Cream
  1. Scoop the cajeta into the bowl of stand mixer and add the cream and salt. Beat with the whisk attachment until stiff peaks form. Transfer to an airtight container and keep covered in the fridge for 3 days.
Notes
  1. Homemade Cajeta
  2. 2 quarts whole goats milk
  3. 2 cups sugar
  4. 1 cinnamon stick
  5. A pinch of salt
  6. ½ teaspoon baking soda dissolved in one Tablespoon water
  7. Heat the goats milk and sugar with the cinnamon stick and salt in a large, deep pot (5 – 6 quart) over medium heat until the milk is simmering and the sugar has dissolved, stirring occasionally. Pull the pot off the heat and stir in the baking soda and water – it may foam up, just give it a good stir. Return the pot to the heat and continue cooking the milk, stirring frequently, until it becomes a light amber color, anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour. Watch carefully and keep it at gentle but meaningful bubble or it will boil over. When the milk begins to turn golden, stir very frequently and watch carefully until the mix turns a caramel brown and thickens to the consistency of syrup. Drop a few spoonfuls on a cold plate and see that it thickens to a caramel sauce consistency. Pour the cajeta through a strainer into a bowl and cool, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to a month.
  8. When cooking the cajeta, if it gets too thick, remove the pan from the heat and whisk in a few tablespoons of water until it reaches the right consistency. When using the cajeta, you can warm it in the microwave to loosen it up, or if it is really thick, transfer it to a saucepan over medium heat and whisk in some water until it thins out.
The Runaway Spoon http://therunawayspoon.com/blog/
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