I'm P.C., and I have studied food and cooking around the world, mostly by eating, but also through serious study. Coursework at Le Cordon Bleu London and intensive courses in Morocco, Thailand and France have broadened my culinary skill and palate. But my kitchen of choice is at home, cooking like most people, experimenting with unique but practical ideas.

I live, mostly in my kitchen, in my hometown of Memphis, Tennessee.

Swedish Waitress Apple Cake with Vanilla Custard

Swedish Waitress Apple Cake with Vanilla Custard

A recipe developer asks a lot of questions. It’s the best way to learn the secrets of cooking – the little tips and hints and tricks people use, things they learned from mothers, grandmothers and aunts, secrets from fathers, advice from magazines, cookbooks and the back of boxes, or lessons learned from failure. So I ask questions. In restaurants, stores, markets, from neighbors, friends and strangers. Thus this cake. I was in a bakery in London having tea on a rainy day, and the very sweet waitress said that on a gloomy day, one should always have a piece of cake. I had to agree and asked for recommendations. She suggested the apple cake – with the caveat that it was her second favorite apple cake, as her mother made the absolute best version. So I asked her to describe her mother’s cake. What struck me was the apples. Her mother, she assured me, peeled and chopped the apples and tossed them with sugar and cinnamon and let them sit for hours, until they produced their own syrup. She then put the apples on top of a simple butter cake and drizzled the juices over. I was intrigued, and wrote the idea in my little travel notebook.

The waitress was Swedish, working at the bakery while she studied at university in London. I could tell describing her mother’s cake made her a little wistful for home. I don’t know if this method is typically Swedish or the whole-cloth invention of her mother, but I knew it was an idea I had to try for myself. As I was in London at the time I learned about this method, I thought I would add a classic British custard sauce – no British dessert is complete without it!

Swedish Waitress Apple Cake with Vanilla Custard
Serves 8
For the Vanilla Custard
  1. 2 cups milk
  2. ½ a vanilla bean
  3. 2 egg yolks
  4. ½ cup granulated sugar
  5. 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
For the Cake
  1. 1 cup plus 3 Tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
  2. 1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  3. 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
  4. ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  5. 3 baking apples
  6. 5 Tablespoons butter, softened
  7. 3 eggs
  8. 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  9. 1 teaspoon baking powder
  10. ¼ cup milk
  11. 1 teaspoon vanilla
For the Custard
  1. Put the milk in a medium saucepan and scrape the seeds of the vanilla bean into it. Heat over medium just until small bubbles appear around the edges and on the surface.
  2. While the milk is heating, mix the yolks, sugar and corn starch together in a medium mixing bowl. When the milk is warm, slowly drizzle a little into the egg yolk mixture, whisking all the time, then continue to whisk in the milk slowly until well combined and smooth. Pour the custard back into the sauce pan and heat over medium, stirring frequently until it thickens and coats the back of the spoon. Pour the custard through a sieve back into a bowl and place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard and refrigerate until cold. This can be made up to one day ahead.
For the Cake
  1. Mix 3 tablespoons of sugar, the cinnamon, cardamom and cloves together in a medium sized bowl. One at a time, peel and core the apples and chop into small cubes, dropping them into the bowl and tossing with the sugar mixture to coat completely. Leave the apples, completely coated in the sugar, to sit for several hours, until some juices have been released (I usually wait about 4 hours, longer is fine).
  2. When ready to bake the cake, preheat the oven to 350. Spray a 9-inch springform pan with cooking spray. Cream the butter and 1 cup of sugar together in the bowl of an electric mixer until light and fluffy, then add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the flour and baking powder, then add the milk and vanilla and beat until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  3. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top of the batter. Spread the apple pieces over the top of the batter, pressing them into the cake a little, then drizzle over the accumulated juices. Bake for 45 – 55 minutes, until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Leave the cake to cool at least 20 minutes, then release it from the pan. Serve warm or at room temperature. The cake can be made one day ahead.
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Fresh Fig Mousse

Fresh Fig MousseI adore figs, and during their short growing season here, I really try to make the most of them. I make jars and jars of Fig, Bourbon and Vanilla Bean Jam. It is one of my signature preserves now, one people always ask me for. My Fresh Fig Cake with Buttermilk Glaze is a summer favorite as well – it’s a wonderful way to incorporate figs into baking. And of course, I eat the figs on their own, maybe with a little country ham wrapped around them, sometimes then thrown on the grill.

I saw a recipe for a simple fig mousse in an old community cookbook and honestly couldn’t believe I hadn’t thought of the idea before. I tweeked and modernized the recipe a little, so it is now a very simple and refreshing summer dessert with a real touch of elegance and panache, with the added bonus that it needs to made ahead so it is ready and waiting. Figs in their natural state are so pretty, that a simple slice of pink flesh with delicate purple tinge makes an absolutely beautiful garnish on the soft pink, marbled mousse. This mouse can be served frozen, or just chilled until firm – I like equally either way. I prefer to use darker purple figs for the rich color, but if brown are all you have access to, they are delicious as well.

Fresh Fig Mousse
Serves 6
  1. 1 cup halved fresh figs (about 8) plus more for garnish
  2. 3 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  3. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  4. ½ cup confectioners’ sugar
  5. 1 cup heavy cream
  1. Place the fig pieces, lemon juice, vanilla and powdered sugar in a blender and puree until smooth, scraping down the sides of the carafe as needed.
  2. Whip the cream in an electric mixer until it forms stiff peaks. Gently fold the puree into the cream a little at a time, making sure the cream and puree are combined. Spoon the mousse into eight small or six larger glass bowls or ramekins and smooth the tops.
  3. You can freeze the mousse, each covered with plastic wrap, for up to two days and serve frozen or slightly softened, or you can cover the dishes with plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator until firm, about 4 hours or up to one day ahead.
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Blueberry Sour Cream Torte

Blueberry Sour Cream Torte

The high heat of summer doesn’t seem to me like the time for complicated baking and cooking, or entertaining. But the abundance of beautiful, in-season fruits and berries means I definitely want to create some delicious dishes. This one fits the bill, making the most of juicy blueberries in a rustic, creamy torte. It has all the hallmarks of a great summer dessert – it looks much more complicated than it is, must be made ahead and is cool and refreshing on a hot day. Serve this as the finale to a cookout or keep it in the fridge for a sweet snack.

I like this dessert because it has the creaminess of a cheesecake with the cookie-like base of a bar, but somehow seems easier to pull together than either. The blueberries seep a lovely purple color into the creamy topping which makes for a very pretty dish when served. I can’t resist adding a little dash of nutmeg to blueberry sweets because it marries so beautifully, adding a little hint of spice and intrigue.

Blueberry Sour Cream Torte
Serves 6
  1. ½ cup (1 stick) butter, softened
  2. 1 cup sugar, divided
  3. 1 egg
  4. 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  5. 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  6. 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  7. 2 cups fresh blueberries
  8. 2 cups (16 ounces) sour cream
  9. 2 egg yolks
  10. ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  1. Preheat the oven to 350. Thoroughly grease an 8 or 9 inch springform pan.
  2. Beat the butter on medium speed in a stand mixer to loosen it up, then gradually add ½ cup sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg and 1 teaspoon of vanilla until well blended. Beat the flour and baking powder in at low speed in small additions, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed. Make sure all the flour is incorporated – you can use a spatula to blend it in if needed. Transfer the dough to the pan and press it into an even layer over the bottom. Spread the blueberries in an even layer over the base.
  3. Stir the sour cream, remaining ½ cup sugar, egg yolks, 1 teaspoon of vanilla and nutmeg together until smooth and spread the mix over the blueberries in the pan, creating an even layer. It’s okay if some berries are peaking through.
  4. Bake the torte for 1 hour until the edges are golden. The very center may still be slightly jiggly, but overall the top should be firm and set. Cool the torte on a wire rack to keep the base from getting soggy, then place it in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight.
  5. Run a thin knife around the edges of the torte, then release the ring, slice and serve.
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Zucchini Lime Drizzle Cake

Zucchini Lime Drizzle Cake

Zucchini breads and cakes are a go to during the growing season, when there is always one left from your farmers market haul, or just too many growing in your garden. I like my zucchini bakes light and fresh, rather than dark and spiced, so with that one lingering zucchini on the counter, I returned to my recipe for Zucchini Lemon Gems to make a loaf cake. I’ve switched to lime for a little difference, and used rich olive oil and tangy Greek yogurt to make the cake moist and zippy.

I debated whether to call this a bread or a cake. It is a cake more in the sense of an English cake, served at tea, rather than the rich frosted confections we think of. But the crackly sweet glaze makes it a little richer than a zucchini bread. Without the glaze, you definitely have a simple bread, but I really think it adds a special touch. Serve this as snack (with iced tea in the summer of course) or for breakfast. But served with a scattering of fresh berries and some lightly sweetened whipped cream, it makes a creative summer dessert packed full of in season flavor.

Zucchini Lime Drizzle Cake
Serves 10
For the Cake
  1. 2 eggs
  2. 1/2 cup olive oil
  3. 2/3 cup sugar
  4. 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  5. Zest of 1 medium limes
  6. 2 Tablespoons lime juice
  7. 1 cup finely grated zucchini (about 1 medium zucchini)
  8. 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  9. 2 teaspoons baking powder
  10. 1/2 teaspoon salt
For the glaze
  1. Zest of one medium lime
  2. 3 Tablespoons lime juice
  3. 5 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Grease a 9 by 5 inch loaf pan.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs then stir in the oil, sugar and yogurt until well blended. Add the lime juice and zest and the zucchini. Stir until blended, making sure the zucchini is evenly distributed. Add the flour, baking powder and salt and stir until just blended, with no streaks of flour left.
  3. Spoon the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 40 - 45 minutes until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.
  4. While the cake is cooking, mix the sugar and lemon juice for the glaze in a small bowl. The sugar should not dissolve completely.
  5. Leave the cake to cool in the tin for a few minutes, then poke holes all over the surface with a skewer or cake tester. Stir the glaze to blend, then spoon it over the cake while it is still hot. Leave the cake to cool and soak up the glaze, then run a thin knofe around the edges to loosen and remove from the pan.
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Blackberry Buttermilk Ice Cream with Bay Leaf Sauce

Blackberry Buttermilk Ice Cream with Bay Leaf SauceBay leaves rarely play a starring role in a recipe. I tend to think that if you leave the bay leaf out of a recipe, you may not notice, but the elusive flavor adds a definite boost to soups and stews, and it’s an essential ingredient in a classic French herb seasoning bouquet garni. When I found this recipe in an old community cookbook, I was intrigued, because I have come to enjoy bay leaves as the primary flavor in roasting potatoes and vegetables. I could imagine that flavor in a sweet sauce and immediately thought of earthy blackberries as the perfect foil. Making the ice cream with buttermilk creates a tangy, creamy base for juicy blackberries and marries beautifully with the sauce. It’s also a pretty dish, the lovely purple ice cream with a drizzle of the golden amber sauce, garnished with an extra berry or two.

The sauce could be served over pound cake with a scattering of berries as an alternative, and I think it would also be delicious with peach ice cream. I really can’t wait to explore more uses for this unique sauce as the summer progresses.

Blackberry Buttermilk Ice Cream with Bay Leaf Sauce
Serves 6
For the Ice Cream
  1. 12 ounces blackberries
  2. 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  3. 1 cup half and half
  4. 5 egg yolks
  5. 1 cup cold buttermilk
For the Sauce
  1. ¾ cup light brown sugar
  2. 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  3. 3 Tablespoons lemon juice
  4. 1 cup water
  5. 6 fresh bay leaves
  1. For the Ice Cream
  2. Puree the blackberries in a blender. Beat the egg yolks and sugar together in the bowl of a stand mixer or with a hand mixer until the sugar is no longer grainy and the mixture is pale. Heat the half and half in a medium saucepan over medium heat, just until it is warm and small bubbles appear on the surface. Dribble the warm half and half into the yolks while beating constantly. Scrape the mixture back into the saucepan and cook over medium, stirring constantly, until the mixture has thickened. It should coat the back of a metal spoon. Pour the custard through a strainer into a bowl to remove any lumps. Stir in the cold buttermilk, then pour the blackberry puree through the rinsed strainer, pressing the pulp through. Stir to blend. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard to prevent a skin from forming and chill the mixture for several hours until completely cold.
  3. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to process the ice cream in an ice cream freezer.
  4. Serve with the bay leaf sauce.
For the Sauce
  1. Whisk the brown sugar and flour together in a medium sauce pan to blend. Add the lemon juice and water and stir to combined. Drop in the bay leaves and cook over medium high heat until the sauce has thickened, about 5 minutes. Leave the sauce to cool, then pour it through a strainer to remove the bay leaves and any lumps. Store, covered, in the fridge for up to two days. It can be served at room temperature or warmed slightly in the microwave or a sauce pan.
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Honey Raspberry Cake

Honey Raspberry CakeRaspberry season is short, and it’s a little hard to find locally grown berries around here. A farmer at the market once told me they were just too labor intensive for him to make much of a profit. When I find them grown here, I jump at the chance. I love to eat them over yogurt with a drizzle of honey, but with a real abundance I like to bake. So I translated that idea into a lovely cake that can be served for breakfast, or as a dessert with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or some sweetened whipped cream

What I particularly love about his cake is that it truly tastes of honey. And there is quite a bit of honey in it to make that happen. I often find baking with honey produces sweetness, but the flavor of the honey just sort of melds into the whole. Not so this cake – it has a very honey forward, with the lovely burst of raspberries throughout. The honey glaze puts the honey front and center again, so use a good, local harvested honey, one with a nice floral undertone if you can find it.

Honey Raspberry Cake
Serves 12
For the Cake
  1. 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
  2. 2 cups honey
  3. 2 teaspoons vanilla
  4. zest from one lemon
  5. 6 large eggs
  6. 2 cups whole wheat flour
  7. 2 cups all-purpose flour
  8. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  9. ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  10. 1 cup plain yogurt (not Greek)
  11. 2 cups fresh raspberries
For the Glaze
  1. 2 Tablespoons honey
  2. 2 Tablespoons milk
  3. 1 cup confectioners’ sugar
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Spray a 10 –inch tube pan or a 12 – cup bundt pan with cooking spray (I like Baker’s Joy).
  2. Beat the butter and honey together in the bowl of a stand mixer at medium low until the mixture is smooth and pale in color, almost white, about 3 minutes. Beat in the vanilla and lemon zest. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. The mixture may look curdled- don’t worry, it will smooth out.
  3. Beat in the flours, baking soda and salt, one cup at a time, alternating with the yogurt, until the batter is smooth and thoroughly combined. Gently fold in 1 ½ cups of the raspberries using a spatula. Place several of the remaining berries in the bottom of the prepared pan, the spoon the batter over them. Spread the batter out evenly to fill the pan, then press the remaining raspberries into the top of the batter.
  4. Bale for 45 – 50 minutes until the cake pulls away from the sides of the pan and a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool in the pan set on a rack for 10 minutes, then invert onto a serving platter.
For the Glaze
  1. Beat the milk and honey together in a medium bowl, then add the confectioners’ sugar until you have a spoonable glaze. Drizzle the glaze over the cake, creating an even layer on the top with which attractively drips down the sides.
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Fresh Strawberry and Cream Pudding

Fresh Strawberry and Cream PuddingA few years ago, I created a Peach Bourbon Buttermilk Pudding to serve to some guests, solely because it was peach season and I had recently acquired some pretty glass vessels that just needed to be used. Now that strawberry season is in full swing, I found myself with some extra berries after a jam making session. I trolled the internet and my own recipe archives for something to do with those berries, but I realized that I wanted something really comforting and creamy and simple – just to set of the beautiful freshness of the berries.

And that’s what this recipe is – miles away from any neon pink concoction from a box and packed full of flavor. This recipe is easy enough to whip up for a weeknight, but can also be an elegant (and slightly cheeky) dessert for a dinner party. Serve it in mason jars or crystal champagne coupes. You can top it with a dollop of shipped cream, whole berries or those elegantly fanned out berry garnishes. When you puree the berries, you could add a splash or liqueur (elderflower is particularly good) or the seeds from a vanilla bean. No matter how you go, homemade strawberry pudding will up your pudding game completely.

Fresh Strawberry and Cream Pudding
Serves 6
  1. 1 envelope plain, unflavored gelatin
  2. 1 quart strawberries, hulled
  3. ½ cup sugar
  4. 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  1. Stir the gelatin and 2 Tablespoons of water together in a small bowl and set aside to become soft.
  2. Puree the strawberries and sugar in a blender or food processor. You should end up with 2 cups puree. Pour ½ cup of the strawberry puree into a medium saucepan and heat over medium high heat. Stir in the gelatin and heat just until the gelatin is dissolved. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the rest of the strawberry puree. Refrigerate until the puree is cooled, but not set, about 1 hour.
  3. Whip the heavy cream with an electric or stand mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold the whipped cream into the cold strawberry puree, making sure all the puree is distributed through the cream.
  4. Gently spoon the pudding into small cups or ramekins and refrigerate for 3 – 4 hours until softly set.
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Chocolate Dutch Baby with Vanilla Roasted Strawberries

Chocolate Dutch Baby with Vanilla Roasted StrawberriesIt is hard not to want to eat something called a Dutch Baby. It’s such a sweet and inviting name. The puffy oven pancakes have experienced something of a renaissance in the last few years, with lots of recipes showing up on the internet for sweet and savory versions with all sorts of flavorings and toppings. I, however, sometimes find a plain Dutch baby a little too plain, so I’ve amped it up with chocolate here, and paired it with chocolate’s natural spring partner, strawberries.

There are a lot of things I love about this recipe. The baby is rich and chocolate-y without being cloyingly sweet. Roasting the strawberries heightens their sweetness, and vanilla adds such an aromatic note. Roasting is particularly helpful if your berries are not super-sweet to begin with, or just a little past their prime. Each component of this recipe is delicious on its own, or paired with other things. Most of all, this could not be easier to make. The berries can be roasted a day ahead, and making the baby in the blender literally takes minutes. If you like things a little sweeter, you can serve this with vanilla ice cream, or a cloud of sweetened whipped cream. Most recipes I have read say serve the Dutch baby immediately out of the oven, but I can tell you I’ve had it at room temperature and it was fine.

Chocolate Dutch Baby with Vanilla Roasted Strawberries
Serves 6
For the Strawberries
  1. 1 pound strawberries, hulled
  2. 2 Tablespoons sugar
  3. 1 vanilla bean
For the Dutch Baby
  1. 2 Tablespoons butter
  2. ¾ cup whole milk
  3. 3 eggs
  4. 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  5. ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  6. ¼ teaspoon salt
  7. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  8. ¼ cup granulated sugar
For the Strawberries
  1. Cut the berries in half and spread them in a single layer in an 8 by 8 inch baking dish. Put the sugar in a small bowl. Cut the vanilla bean in half and scrape out the seeds with the back of a knife. Drop the seeds into the sugar and toss it all around to blend. I like to toss the bowl a few times, then use my good clean fingers to get the vanilla distributed through the sugar. Sprinkle the sugar over the strawberries, then cut the vanilla bean into three pieces and tuck them into the berries. Bake for 20 – 25 minutes, until the berries are soft and lots of juice has run out. Don’t overcook or the berries will break down and become mushy.
  2. You can serve the berries immediately or cool, cover and refrigerate them for up to a day.
For the Dutch Baby
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°. Melt the butter in in a deep oven-safe skillet, about 9 to 10-inches, over medium heat. Do not let it brown.
  2. Place all the ingredients in the order listed in a blender and blend until combined and foamy, about 1 minute. Pour the batter into the hot skillet, then transfer it to the oven and bake until the Dutch baby until puffed and set, about 20 minutes.
  3. Spoon the strawberries over the Dutch baby immediately and serve.
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Buttermilk Brownies with Bourbon Caramel Frosting

Buttermilk Brownies with Bourbon Caramel FrostingNothing is quite so simply satisfying as a good brownie. Even the plainest, unadorned chocolate bite can fulfill the needs of any sweet tooth craving. But the simple brownie can also be a brilliant canvas for creativity, taking on stir-in surprises, creamy frostings or decadent drizzles. Serving a plate of brownies at a party or to family and friends always gets a lively response. So I like to mix it up sometimes – take the simple brownie concept to a new and indulgent level.My penchant for baking with buttermilk comes into play here, making these rich chocolate treats tangy and ultra-moist. I add some Southern flair with a rich frosting of caramel set off with a good kick of bourbon.

These brownies are easy to make – they only use one pan and the 13 by 9 inch size makes sure there are plenty to go around (even a few to squirrel away for yourself). You can use the same pan for the caramel, but I have found that transferring it to a mixer makes for a smoother, fluffier icing over beating it in by hand. The rich, buttery notes of the caramel, enhanced by a generous tot of earthy bourbon, is a revelation. I’m sure I’ll find many uses for it.

Buttermilk Brownies with Bourbon Caramel Frosting
Yields 20
For the Brownies
  1. 1 cup (2 sticks) butter
  2. 1 cup water
  3. 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  4. 2 Tablespoons bourbon
  5. 2 cups granulated sugar
  6. 1 cup all purpose flour
  7. 1 teaspoon baking soda
  8. ½ cup buttermilk
  9. 2 eggs
For the Frosting
  1. ½ cup (1 stick) butter
  2. ½ cup heavy cream
  3. 4 Tablespoons bourbon, divided
  4. 1 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed
  5. ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  6. 3 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
For the brownies
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Line a 9 by 13-inch brownie pan with parchment paper or non-stick foil.
  2. Place the butter, water, cocoa powder and bourbon in a large saucepan and cook over medium heat until the butter is melted and the mixture is smooth. Remove from the heat and let cool for a few minutes. Stir in the sugar until combined, then add the flour and baking soda and stir until thoroughly combined. Measure the buttermilk in a 2-cup jug, then beat in the eggs. Add this to the batter and stir until combined. The batter will be thin. Pour into the prepared pan and bake for 30 – 35 minutes until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Leave to cool in the pan.
For the Frosting
  1. Place the butter, cream, 2 Tablespoons of the bourbon and the brown sugar in a large saucepan and heat over medium heat until the butter is melted and the sugar is dissolved. Bring to a slow boil and cook for 3 minutes, then remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly.
  2. Pour the cooked caramel into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and add 1 cup of the confectioners’ sugar. Beat until smooth, then add the remaining 2 Tablespoons of bourbon, the remaining 2 cups of confectioners’ sugar and the salt and beat until smooth. Spread the batter over the cooled brownies and leave to set for at a few hours.
  3. Cut the brownies into generous squares
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Persimmon Pie

Persimmon Pie

Some years ago I came across some American persimmons, which are a little hard to find in this part of the country nowadays. I got a little overexcited and bought quite a few of the rare gems, so I had to go searching for recipes. A friend gave me an old recipe from her family for persimmon pie, and I quickly made it. I appreciated the novelty of it– I’d never even heard of persimmon pie until she gave me the recipe – so I continued to make it with imported Japanese persimmons, which are readily available in the cold of winter here. But at some point, I realized that the original version, loaded with classic pumpkin pie spices like cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves really didn’t taste that much like persimmon. In fact, it was pretty close to pumpkin pie. I have tinkered with the basic recipe, reducing the spice to the barest hint of subtle mace and adding a nice dose of complimentary orange that brings out the fruitiness of the persimmons, while highlighting the slightly floral undertones. Now I feel like this is a unique dessert that makes the most of lovely persimmons.

I revisited this recipe recently, because I happened to find some dried persimmon slices in the store, and I couldn’t help but think how pretty they would look as a garnish. A dollop of whipped cream is also a nice touch.

Persimmon Pie
Serves 8
  1. Pastry for one 9-inch pie, homemade or rolled store bought
  2. Zest and juice of one orange
  3. 1 large Hachiya persimmon (about 9 ounces)
  4. 3 eggs
  5. 1 cup heavy cream
  6. 1 Tablespoon butter, melted
  7. 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  8. 2 Tablespoons light brown sugar
  9. ½ teaspoon vanilla
  10. ¼ teaspoon mace
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°.
  2. Line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry, then line with parchment paper and fill with baking weights or tried beans. Blind bake the crust for 15 minutes, then remove from the oven and gently remove the paper and weights. Leave to cool slightly.
  3. Zest the orange into a large mixing bowl, then squeeze the juice into a bowl or measuring cup. Place 2 Tablespoons of the juice in a blender. Cut the stem from the persimmon and cut into pieces and add to the blender. Blend until smooth. You should have one cup of puree. Crack the eggs into the mixing bowl and lightly beat, then stir in the puree, the cream and the butter until well combined. Add the sugars, vanilla and mace and beat until well combined.
  4. Pour the filling into the crust and bake the pie for 50 minutes to an hour until the filling is set and only slightly jiggly in the center. Cool completely, then refrigerate until firm.
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