The Southern Sympathy Cookbook

I'm P.C., and I have studied food and cooking around the world, mostly by eating, but also through serious study. Coursework at Le Cordon Bleu London and intensive courses in Morocco, Thailand and France have broadened my culinary skill and palate. But my kitchen of choice is at home, cooking like most people, experimenting with unique but practical ideas.

I live, mostly in my kitchen, in my hometown of Memphis, Tennessee.

Parmesan Thyme Cocktail Biscuits

Savory little cheese wafers are the perfect accompaniment to a sophisticated cocktail. I have made more versions with cheddar cheese than I can count, and have branched out with my famous Blue Cheese and Fig Savories. But you can never have too many variations of these lovely little nibbles, and this one is a perfect treat with a glass of champagne or a crisp white wine. And best of all, they are simple to make and can be prepared ahead. But for all that, they are still elegant and sophisticated.

This recipe is loosely based on one from seminal British food writer Elizabeth David, and in a nod to the original, I have veered away from a traditional thin cheese wafer and cut these thicker. I love that this creates crispy edges with a crumbly center. David was known for bringing the flavors of the Mediterranean to a postwar, ration-weary Britain, and though this recipe certainly has an Italian flair, her inspiration was a recipe from a cookbook published in 1909 from the notes of an English aristocrat. I have simplified things with the food processor and the roll and slice method and added a nice herbaceous note from fresh thyme. A final sprinkling of nice flaky sea salt is the perfect finish.

Parmesan Thyme Cocktail Biscuits
Yields 12
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Ingredients
  1. ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cold
  2. 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  3. ½ cup grated parmesan cheese
  4. 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  5. ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus more to sprinkle the tops
  6. 2 egg yolks
  7. ¼ cup water
Instructions
  1. Cut the butter into small pieces and put it on top of the flour in the bowl of a food processor. Add the cheese, thyme and 1/2 teaspoon salt and pulse until crumbly and combined. Add the egg yolks and process until the dough just begins to come together and looks moist and grainy. With motor running, drizzle in the water until the dough begins to pull away from the sides and form a ball.
  2. Remove the dough to a piece of waxed paper and knead a few times to bring it all together. Form the dough a log and roll tightly, pressing in to form a nice solid log. Twist the ends of the waxed paper like a candy wrapper. Refrigerate for at least an hour before baking, but you can refrigerate them for two days or freeze them for 3 months.
  3. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 320° and line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Remove the rolls from the fridge and slice into medium-thick wafers, about ½ inch each. Place them on the baking sheet with a little room to spread and sprinkle the tops with a pinch of flaky sea salt. Bake until golden around the edged and firm on the top, about 25 - 30 minutes, until the edges are just beginning to brown. Cool on the pans for a few minutes, then remove to wire racks to cool.
The Runaway Spoon http://therunawayspoon.com/blog/

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